Thursday, 1 April 2010

And Symbols Glorious Swinging Uproarious...

"...On this I ponder where'er I wander and thus grow fonder, sweet Cork, of thee; with thy bells of Shandon that sound so grand on the pleasant waters of the River Lee..."

So runs one of the most famous hymns of the Corkonian faith and the Easter Vacation brought me back within the sound of Shandon bells. I thought it would be interesting to take a look at the Lenten preparations in some of the Churches in the centre of Cork City. As you would expect, most of them have retained the loss of the striking symbolism of veiling statues from after the second last Sunday of Lent (Passion Sunday). However, there are signs of a change in the air.

Cork, of course, led the way in the restoration of the Latin Mass with a daily Mass, albeit very discreetly, long before the election of Pope Benedict XVI. Today, the City boasts not only the Sunday Mass in Ss. Peter and Paul's but even a daily Mass during Lent supplemented by Tenebrae each of the three days of the Triduum and the full Holy Week Ceremonies.

However, it is more interesting to see the veils assumed in two other Churches in the City. The Dominicans of Pope's Quay also had the Office of Tenebrae, partly in Latin, with the hearse of fifteen candles left in the centre of the Sanctuary. They also veiled the Altar Cross. This beautiful Church is one of the first that I meet as I come into the City. It contains the tablet: "The Dominican community of Cork inscribe this stone in testimony of their gratitude to Kearns Deane Esq., architect, who with unexampled generosity and public spirit designed this building and directed the progress of its erection, 1832.” The consecration in October 1839 was attended by Daniel O'Connell, barrister and statesman, who had spearheaded the campaign for Catholic Emancipation only ten days before. The crisp ionic portico stands in contrast to the high gothic flourish of the Capuchin Holy Trinity Church on the South Channel of the Lee.



The Franciscans on Liberty Street may have built in the Byzantine style but they veiled the crosses of both the high altar and side altars very much in the Roman manner this year. The Church has the greatest area of mosaics of any church in Europe outside of Rome. The central dome has the feel of Hagia Sophia in Istanbul. The Church is famous for the gifts of wedding rings by the women of Cork for the tabernacle.






Finally, I took some shots of Ss. Peter and Paul's. The gorgeous Gothic Church hidden away behind Patrick's Street is the first collaboration of George Ashlin and Edward Pugin.



[Feel free to use these images but please credit this blog and give proper reference to the locations - Convenor]

8 comments:

Teresa said...

That is a gorgeous church! Have a wonderful Easter holiday :)

Jackeen said...

I know that the Cathedral of Cork was fairly emptied by the liturgiclasts but are these the only three that have retained the beauty of their interiors or have others been as fortunate? Could you give us an idea of the churches of Cork City in some future post?

Anonymous said...

Up Cork!

Anonymous said...

May God guide, guard and keep all those involved in this.

Donnelly's Hollow said...

This is a great tradition. Maybe the Dominicans in Newbridge will return to it and set a good example for the rest of the Diocese.

Anonymous said...

I had totally forgotten that this used to happen. Its very strange to see it again but it added to the sense of occasion.

Convenor said...

I'd just like to put my thanks and admiration on record to and for our 'Shandon Belle,' who may not have the same angle on these subjects as the rest of us but who puts immense effort and talent into bringing them to us and, what is more, lets me mess about with them when I see things differently. For all your goodness and greatness, I want readers to know that we are deeply and humbly grateful! God bless you and up Cork!

Sally Ryan said...

Fantastic but what about calling over to Waterford? We have some amazing Churches